How Much Did The Duplex Kitchens Cost?

How Much Did The Duplex Kitchens Cost?

As our bathroom reno continues (current status: more demo happened, our vanity, tub, & toilet arrived, and we have our plumber & electrician scheduled to rough things in and then we can prep & tile) we thought it would be fun to share a duplex kitchen budget breakdown. *Also, for anyone who has inquired about renting the duplex this fall, there’s an announcement about that later in the post*

wood cabinets | tile | counters | pendant | faucet | hardware | tall cutting board |walls: SW Spare White | trim: SW Extra White

Obviously, there are LOTS of factors that affect how expensive a kitchen renovation will be, so let this post just be a reference point for you – not a prescription for how much a kitchen reno should cost.

Continue reading How Much Did The Duplex Kitchens Cost? at Young House Love.

As our bathroom reno continues (current status: more demo happened, our vanity, tub, & toilet arrived, and we have our plumber & electrician scheduled to rough things in and then we can prep & tile) we thought it would be fun to share a duplex kitchen budget breakdown. *Also, for anyone who has inquired about renting the duplex this fall, there’s an announcement about that later in the post*

Wood Colored Opened Shelf Against Blue Tile Backsplash wood cabinets | tile | counters | pendant | faucet | hardware | tall cutting board |walls: SW Spare White | trim: SW Extra White

Obviously, there are LOTS of factors that affect how expensive a kitchen renovation will be, so let this post just be a reference point for you – not a prescription for how much a kitchen reno should cost. The average kitchen reno in 2019 was $24,047 (according to HomeAdvisor). That may seem pricey to some but feel like a steal to others. Heck, Sherry even saw an expert in House Beautiful’s recent kitchen issue who said “kitchen renovations can run anywhere from $60,000 to $400,000” (!!!!!). The pricetags for these kitchens were nowhere near that, thankfully, but we did want to share some areas that, in hindsight, we could’ve done more affordably.

Full Duplex Kitchen With Planked Wall And Pink Tile Backsplash blue cabinets |white cabinets | tile | counters | fridge | range | pendant | faucet | hardware | tall cutting board | walls: SW Spare White | trim: SW Extra White

The breakdown below includes all of the major items in each kitchen, apart from things that were part of the overall renovation of the duplex (like new drywall, electrical & plumbing, floor refinishing, etc). Not that those aren’t critical parts of this room (THEY ARE!) but they were line items that we paid for as a whole house, so it’d be impossible to splice out just the kitchen portion of the bill. But I’ll give you some ballpark estimates and specific examples of what we have personally paid for those line items in other kitchen remodels we’ve done in a minute.

Blue Tile Backsplash With Open Wood Shelves In Duplex Kitchen wood cabinets | white cabinets | tile | counters | range | pendant | faucet | hardware | tall cutting board |walls: SW Spare White | trim: SW Extra White

So we’re basically chronically what it takes to go from a blank box of a room to a finished kitchen, aka going from this starting point…

…to this finished kitchen below:

Wood Askersund Ikea Cabinets With Blue Tile Backsplash wood cabinets | white cabinets | tile | counters |fridge | range | pendant | faucet | hardwaretall cutting board |walls: SW Spare White | trim: SW Extra White

The price breakdown below is just for one kitchen, since the price was effectively the same for each side (these rooms are a mirror image of each other). There aren’t any labor costs listed below because we did all of these projects ourselves, but we’ll get to the labor fees we’ve paid on past kitchen remodels in a second to give you a more complete picture. Please hold (*insert elevator music here*).

  • Ikea Cabinets (& hinges, drawer slides, etc): $2,100
  • Hardware: $100 ($24.99 x 4 packs)
  • Quartz Counters (sink and installation included): $2,850
  • Appliances (including microwave & vent hood): $2,550
  • Backsplash: $475
  • Floating Shelves: $90
  • Horizontal planking: $31 (read the DIY details here)
  • Faucet: $155
  • Pendant Light: $140
  • TOTAL: $8,491

Full Duplex Kitchen With Planked Wall And Pink Tile Backsplash blue cabinets |white cabinets | tile | counters | fridge | range | pendant | faucet | hardware | tall cutting board | walls: SW Spare White | trim: SW Extra White

I’ll be honest that the total was a little more than we expected, but I guess I’m not surprised to see that two biggest culprits are: counters and appliances.

Wood Colored Opened Shelf Against Blue Tile Backsplash cabinets | tile | counters | pendant | faucet | hardware mugs | paper towel holder | toastercoffee maker

We have zero regrets or hesitations about picking the counters we did (they’re the same quartz we have in our beach house island). Yes there are cheaper options, especially for a rental, but we have just been so happy with quartz in our own kitchen and at the beach house. No issues at all with staining or cracking or scratching – and it’s nice to have a surface you don’t have to worry about. So while it’s an area we could’ve pinched our pennies tighter, we’re glad we didn’t.

The appliances, on the other hand, are a slightly different story. I don’t regret what we did, but I do see some easy places to save money if we weren’t being so particular.

Built-In Fridge Cabinet In Ikea Kitchen blue cabinets | white cabinets | counters | hardware | microwave | faux fern | fridge

For one, white appliances would’ve been cheaper all around than stainless steel. But (like it or not) stainless steel still signals “updated kitchen!” to most people and we just thought the look would make our kitchens feel more upgraded to guests. We also could’ve found a cheaper range by not getting a slide-in, and there were cheaper fridges, but most had icemakers and/or water dispensers – both of which we didn’t want (just another leak to worry about – and if the power goes out the ice in an ice maker can melt and ruin the floor if no one’s there to see it).

blue cabinets | white cabinets | counters | hardware | utensil holder | range | exhaust hoodmicrowave | faux fern | fridge

But the real budget hogs in the appliance department were, surprisingly, the ones that we purchased through Ikea: the hood and the dishwasher. Why? Because we upgraded to versions that we could build in so they’d be hidden. For instance, their in-cabinet recirculating hood was $500 (gulp). We’re ultimately glad we did it, but it does sting a little to see how compromising to a visible under-cabinet hood could’ve saved us a few hundred dollars (this one is just $50!).

Ikea Eventuell Hidden Range Exhaust Hood Closed And Open

Similarly, Ikea’s cheapest option for a cabinet-fronted dishwasher is still $750 which, in retrospect, is probably the most we’ve ever paid for any dishwasher in the history of ever (and it’s not even in a house we stay in!).

Cabinet Fronted Dishwasher And Trash Can In Ikea Kallarp Kitchen dishwasher | trash can | cabinets | tile | counters | hardware |coffee maker | toaster | mugs | pink cups | faux succulent

So while Ikea and other places offer dishwashers that are much cheaper, we splurged on these because it was important to us that they blend into this space. These kitchens are visible as soon as you walk in the front door, and we didn’t want that row of lower cabinets interrupted by a big stainless steel or white dishwasher front.

Bright Dining Room With Capiz Chandelier Looking Into Pink And Blue Kitchen dining chairs | similar dining tablechandelier | mirror | cabinets | tile | pendant | faucet | hardware | walls: SW Spare White | trim: SW Extra White

So we don’t regret these decisions because they were intentional and we’re really happy with the result – but from a purely budget standpoint, they do stick out as areas where compromising the design could’ve saved us some significant money.

Duplex Dining Room With Blue And Wood Kitchen In Background cabinets | white cabinets | tile | dining chairs | similar dining table | chandelier | art | walls: SW Spare White | trim: SW Extra White

And again, there are several costs not included in that total above (flooring, plumbing, electrical, etc), so I’m not trying to declare this “an $8500 kitchen makeover!” But if it helps to give you a better idea, we typically spend around $3.50 per square foot for a pro to refinish our hardwoods. This kitchen is 11.5′ x 10′, so it would break down to around $402 for that room only if I needed a labor line item for the floors. If you add that additional labor line item to our total, it would bring it to: $8,893.

As for electrical fees/labor/parts, during our first house’s kitchen reno we paid $900 for electrical and our second house’s kitchen reno electrical was $455, but both could’ve been significantly more if we were doing more extensive rewiring. Although if you’re gutting a room completely and removing all the drywall (like we did in the duplex), electrical work is often much cheaper since it’s easier access and faster to run everything. And if you also add a kind-of-in-the-middle electrical labor average of $700 to our total, it would bring it to: $9,593.

We didn’t have plumbing costs for our first two kitchen remodels (since everything stayed in the same place), but in our current house we paid our plumber $650 to move our sink and dishwasher locations, to run a new water line to the fridge, and to extend our gas line to the new gas stove. Magazines always tell you moving the location of things can be a ton of money, so we were pleasantly surprised to change the entire kitchen layout and basically just pay $650 to do it! Well worth it!

And once again, like electrical it’s much cheaper to get plumbing redone if all the walls are open (no drywall = such faster access to run things), so we would guess we paid around $500 in plumbing fees to get the sink hooked up (remember there’s no fridge water line & no gas stove here – nice & simple). So if you want to assign a plumbing labor fee of $500 to our total, it would bring it to: $10,093.

Is a $10,000 kitchen cheap? Nope. But it really isn’t bad considering every single thing in the room wasn’t in there when we started. It was an empty box, and now it has two full walls of new cabinetry, quartz countertops, all new appliances (with a slide in range, a built-in dishwasher, and hidden range hood), accent tile to the ceiling, and nice shiny hardwoods. We’re counting our lucky stars that things like the brick chimney and the hardwood floors were in here hiding the whole time, because they definitely add a ton of character to the space.

Of course I need to point out that these labor costs can vary greatly when it comes to your location and your specific situation/house setup (is there a crawl space? slab? a second floor? a cement wall?) so those are just some fees we’ve paid in the past in the hopes that they help. I know we’ll hear from folks who have paid much less and significantly more for each of those things, but a lot just has to do with your house, what you’re looking to achieve, where you live, who you hire for the job, etc.

White Planked Wall In Duplex Kitchen With Wood Shelves wood cabinets | white cabinets | tile | counters |fridge | range | pendant | faucet | hardwaretall cutting board |walls: SW Spare White | trim: SW Extra White

One good way to get an idea of average costs is to use a site like HomeAdvisor (this isn’t sponsored, they just always come up when I google things like “average cost to refinish wood floors“) which will show that our typical $3.50/square foot labor fees are on the higher end of those costs at $3.50, so who knows, yours could be less!

And speaking of the duplex, for anyone who has inquired about fall bookings, we released some dates & almost all of them are booked… but the end of this week is still available on the left side, and the end of next week is available on both sides (here’s the link to the right side). We do a minimum 3 night stay in the off season, so you can check in on Wednesday or Thursday (that’s why those are the only dates Airbnb shows) but once you select your check-in date, it’ll expand & you can select your checkout date. Sorry it’s so confusing! And here’s a post about everything you can do there (even the ice cream shop is still open through next weekend) and a post to see the entire duplex before & after.

But back to kitchen renovations for a second, here are a few more posts you might like:

*This post contains affiliate links*

#150: Changing Our Minds About Our House (Again)

#150: Changing Our Minds About Our House (Again)

Our home’s exterior makeover didn’t stop with painting it white last year, so today we’re catching you up on some projects we’ve completed and what’s still to come (and it involves something we’ve changed our minds about twice). We’re also reflecting on a few experiments & interviews over the past 149 episodes that truly changed the way we live in our house – and we’re issuing a challenge to help us all find some new ways to improve our household routines and daily lives. Plus, we look into why someone might buy a house they’ve never seen, located in a town they’ve never been to (!!!). The idea may be less crazy than it sounds…

You can download this episode from Apple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsStitcherTuneIn Radio, and Spotify – or listen to it below! Note: If you’re reading in a feed reader, you may have to click through to the post to see the player.

Continue reading #150: Changing Our Minds About Our House (Again) at Young House Love.

Our home’s exterior makeover didn’t stop with painting it white last year, so today we’re catching you up on some projects we’ve completed and what’s still to come (and it involves something we’ve changed our minds about twice). We’re also reflecting on a few experiments & interviews over the past 149 episodes that truly changed the way we live in our house – and we’re issuing a challenge to help us all find some new ways to improve our household routines and daily lives. Plus, we look into why someone might buy a house they’ve never seen, located in a town they’ve never been to (!!!). The idea may be less crazy than it sounds…

You can download this episode from Apple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsStitcherTuneIn Radio, and Spotify – or listen to it below! Note: If you’re reading in a feed reader, you may have to click through to the post to see the player.

What’s New

  • As you can see above, the metal awning we discussed back in Episode #139 arrived and is finally up!
  • But as you can also see, there’s still work to do out here. We were able to get the brick holes patched after lowering the lanterns, but there’s a coating of brick dust on everything in this photo, and we still have to paint those freshly patched brick holes (along with caulking and repainting the door surrounding since we had to partially reconstruct it to get the awning in the right spot).
  • Also ignore the peek at that lovely bluestone on the landing – post to come about that soon!
  • And here’s the photo of the duplex as promised so you can reference the shutters.

  • You can hear all the details about why we waffled back and forth (and back again!) about adding shutters to our own house is in this episode, but we’re very excited about the change. Still gotta pick a final color for them (we’re thinking a medium putty type color, kinda sorta like in the photo below).

image source

Can We Just Talk About Roofstock?

  • Here is the Curbed article where I learned about Roofstock. It includes some quotes from folks who have used the site to buy homes they’ve never seen (nor probably ever will), but if you’ve used it we’d be curious to hear about your experience. The whole idea is still equally scary and fascinating to me!

150 Episodes & The Sticking Points Challenge

If you want to check out any of the old episodes or interviews we referenced in today’s podcast, here’s a list below (in order of mention):

  • Episode #12: Sherry beatboxing with Bravo’s Jenni Pulos
  • Episode #113: The (mostly failed) results of our “furniture free” week challenge (originally discussed in Episode #112) – including my makeshift standing desk seen below.

  • Episode #97: What we learned from our “No Spend Month” challenge that we issued to ourselves in Episode #93. It was based on the book The Year of Less (originally discussed in Episode #89) by Cait Flanders (interviewed in Episode #96).
  • Episode #131: The surprisingly lessons learned from our “No TV” challenge (originally issued in Episode #128).

  • Episode #39: Our interview with cleaning expert Melissa Maker
  • Episode #60: Our interview with organizing experts Clea and Joanna from The Home Edit
  • Episode #33: Our interview with Dana Miller about downsizing so they could buy less and do more
  • Episode #128: Our interview with minimalism guru Joshua Becker
  • Episode #126: Our interview with home efficiency expert Stephanie Sikora

  • And speaking of home efficiency, don’t forget the “Sticking Points Challenge” we issued to everyone this week. We’re hoping you guys find kinks in your household routine or little daily annoyances that you can fix quickly, cheaply, or even for free (like us moving our kids’ socks down to the mudroom so they’re easy to grab when it’s time to go to school).
  • If and when you solve those little areas of friction in your daily routine, PLEASE REPORT BACK TO US. You can message us on social media or leave us a voicemail at 571-4-YHLHAP (571-494-5427) so we can do a big follow up episode and share everyone’s tips & tricks.

We’re Digging

  • You actually already saw the Corkcicle canteen that Sherry’s digging a couple of weeks ago in the show notes when she spoke about her love of True Lemon (it’s helping her kick her LaCroix/Hint habit and resulting in way fewer cans in our recycle bin).
  • Her Corkcicle is the canteen version, but they also have these classic tumblers, short tumblers, and stemless wine glasses.
  • And here is the Amazon Echo Auto that I recently got for half price thanks to the preview invitation I requested months ago. We’ve enjoyed having it in the car, especially for handsfree directions, adding things to our Alexa lists, and playing podcasts and songs. I do agree with some of the reviewers that it’s a bit glitchier than the regular Echos we have in the house (I think sometimes it has trouble hearing with the road noise & radio on) but I’m still glad we’ve got it!

If you’re looking for something we’ve dug in a past episode, but don’t remember which show notes to click into, here’s a master list of everything we’ve been digging from all of our past episodes. You can also see all of the books we’ve recommended on our Book Club page.

And lastly, a big thank you to Arrow Fastener for sponsoring this episode. Check out all of their products, including the T-50 staple gun, along with some DIY project ideas at ArrowFastener.com.

Thanks for listening, guys!

*This post contains affiliate links*