Current Obsessions: Fall Forecast

As summer winds down, fall schedules are filling up. What’s on our radar: Margot and Julie are planning a visit to the Fattobene Pop-Up Shop at the MoMA Design Shop in Soho, on display until September 29. Founded by Anna Lagorio and Alex Carnevali  in 2015, Fattobene is a line of rediscovered “everyday archetypes that […]

Current Obsessions: Fall Forecast – RemodelistaIcon – Arrow LeftIcon – Arrow RightIcon – External LinkIcon – MessageIcon – Down ChevronIcon – CloseIcon – Dropdown ArrowIcon – Location PinIcon – Zoom OutIcon – Zoom InIcon – SearchIcon – EmailIcon – FacebookflipboardIcon – InstagramIcon – PinterestIcon – TwitterIcon – Check Mark

An icon we use to indicate a rightwards action. An icon we use to indicate a leftwards action. An icon we use to indicate a button link is external. The icon we use to represent an email action. Used to indicate a dropdown. Used to indicate a close action. Used to indicate a dropdown. Used to showcase a location on a map. Used to indicate a zoom out action on a map. Used to indicate a zoom in action on a map. Used to indicate a search action. Used to indicate an emai action. Facebooks brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Instagrams brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Pinterests brand mark for use in social sharing icons. Twitters brand mark for use in social sharing icons. A check mark for checkbox buttons.

Currently admiring: the Viso Project Beach Chair V61, available in autumnal shades of rust and ochre.

How I Spent My Summer Vacation (a.k.a The Best Summer Ever)

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Summer, 2019. This was the last summer before Charlie, 5 years old, starts real school—kindergarten—where we aren’t in control of our own lives/time as much. It’s the last summer before other, older kids have more influence on him, and perhaps the last summer that he is absolutely obsessed with his parents (although hopefully not). I… Read More …

The post How I Spent My Summer Vacation (a.k.a The Best Summer Ever) appeared first on Emily Henderson.

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Summer, 2019. This was the last summer before Charlie, 5 years old, starts real school—kindergarten—where we aren’t in control of our own lives/time as much. It’s the last summer before other, older kids have more influence on him, and perhaps the last summer that he is absolutely obsessed with his parents (although hopefully not). I say this all with glassy eyes. It was such a good summer I could cry.

In March, I proposed to Brian that we try to work up at the mountain house as much as we can over the summer with the kids. Not to “take the summer off”, but be with the kids as much as possible, up there instead of in LA. There was some resistance, the argument being I can work up there (writing and shooting), but he felt he would be bored and relegated to full-time childcare. I would have other outlets, he wouldn’t. My perspective was that our kids are only young once and while there are many stresses of owning and running your own business, and flexibility is one of the biggest and most valuable ‘pros’. This summer could be the best gift we can give our small kids and each other. Turning 40 next week has certainly made me want to prove to myself that my life choices are indeed mine and I really, really wanted us to choose this choice.

And then the best thing happened. Brian booked a video series job UP THERE. BOOM documenting another makeover (for Jenni Kayne’s president). I mother f*ckin’ manifested that (technically you aren’t supposed to be able to manifest things for others, but I mean, what are the chances???). At this point, we were already paying for some summer camps near LA for both kids, so no, we didn’t stay up there all summer, but I’d say a good 5 weeks over the two months. We had back-to-back very close family/friends from out of town, mostly Oregon, so many “cousins”, and it was incredibly special to have one-on-one time with all of them. We have a rule to only host one family at a time even if we can fit more because we find that we don’t connect with them if there are too many kids running around (nor do we connect with our kids so we had space between most of them where it was just us four).

I wrote/answered emails/comments from 7 am -11 am most days with some larger chunks when needed. And Brian was amazing and would take the kids 4-5 hours at a time during other days so I could work or shoot. I actually got a TON of writing done, in a quiet space (all the mountain house posts). But sacrifices were made and my team was so patient with me as I answered their 4 pm emails at 6 am the next day. Maybe it’s not ideal, but life with two jobs and two kids never is and I suppose I’m actively and proudly currently choosing my family over my work/business. Again, I know that is a very privileged thing to say, and while I often don’t feel like I have a choice, I DO—and not everyone does so I really try to not take it for granted.

Listen, whenever I’m trying to make a decision, I ask the only person who knows me better than myself: my 85-year-old version of me. I asked her if I’d ever regret neglecting work to spend time with my kids while they were so small and she said “NO.” Nobody in the history of time, on their death bed, has wished they spent less time with their kids when they were little. She is very wise.

I didn’t post or story too much what we did over the summer, mostly because I didn’t feel like it or I would simply forget. This is a GREAT thing as a huge part of being with the kids is being present. I hate saying things like “being in the moment” but we all know that social media rips you out of the moment so fast, and thank god I’m not actually addicted to my phone as much as you’d think I am (I got my first cell phone at 22 so I think my brain was more fully formed).

But as I was scrolling through all my photos, like a mom, I wanted to share them because this space has always been a journal for me, both design and personal, and it’s been a while…

So family summer 2019…HERE YOU GO (or at least whatever I remembered to capture).

SO MUCH SWIMMING:

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So many bodies in so many bodies of water. Brian bought this pontoon on craigslist, and while it has broken down like five times, this party barge has absolutely been worth the stress. Besides, being rescued by the lake patrollers is actually kinda fun (twice was because the rope was wrapped up in the propeller; we are “still learning”).

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The kids pretend to not like it ’til they get out there and we cruise, jump in, dock at the island, hike around and listen to “yacht rock.” We might be naming the boat the “Michael MacDonald” because every time we start the speakers, that’s what comes on. Although “I’m hungry, I wanna snack” is a close second because the SECOND we get on, those kids start at it for something packaged.

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We went to the beach a TON. The kids mostly played in the sand and we sat there and read books/magazines and chatted and sipped on a beverage. The water was shallow enough that we didn’t have to worry too much.

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So yes, we swam in lakes, in pools, at the beach. I’m happy to say that through consistency, Charlie is finally able (and comfortable) jumping into the deep end, and swimming to the side without drowning. All of you moms know that this is a moment we’ve been waiting for for 5 and a half years. Can he swim? HELL NO. Can he “not drown”? YES. All it took was consistency. We’ve had them in swim classes twice a week for 15 minutes each (30 total) for months and no progress. But after 2 weeks of swimming most days, we are there. Birdie, not so much. Hopefully this fall or next summer.

GOLF CARTING:

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It became our goal to not get into the car, so we would golf cart it down (in the Ferrari, obviously) to the dock and then take our janky pontoon to the village for lunch or the small amusement park and then back. Brian bought the golf cart on Craigslist an hour away, with the Ferrari bumper sticker already perfectly placed, with a tape deck and fringe on top. It breaks down like once a month but good news! You can pay someone loads of cash each time to fix your 30-year-old piece of garbage!!

SKYPARK AT SANTA’S VILLAGE:

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The most amazing family adventure park is 10 minutes from our house and once we became members, we went there 2-3 times a week. Brian and I got STRANGELY into mountain biking, although it’s extreme. As in professionals come from the whole country to bike down it. Biking has always been something we’ve done together, but I didn’t predict that I would become an extreme mountain biker. This was the beginning of #mountainemily.

Skypark also has rock climbing, bouldering, zipline, archery, kids biking, hiking, fishing, roller skating (ice skating in the winter), panning for jewels, and 2-3 restaurants with decent food and good beers. It’s expensive for the day ($40) but if you can go frequently, it’s the best deal in town. It’s rarely busy so our kids can really run safely (but it makes me worried that it’s going to go out of business so please go!). No ad, and they don’t know I exist. It’s just a special place that used to be a year-round Christmas park that went bankrupt and a local family revamped it as a year-round adventure park with a huge Christmas component with Santas, ice skating, snow, reindeers, etc. IT’S AWESOME.

WE PLAYED IN THE WOODS:

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We made forts, climbed trees, biked around, and did a lot of night hikes with headlights. There are no mosquitos up there and our property backs up to 50 acres that are gated with no cars or bodies of water. It’s an absolute dream for people like us who like just collecting bugs, leaves, and the kids played so many games (all with a “buddy”).

WE CUDDLED AND SLEPT:

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That might be my favorite moment of the summer. We laid in that hammock for an hour, next to the fake river and I got to snuggle both kids in the morning for like 45 minutes while we read. WHAT ELSE COULD YOU WANT?

Sure, we didn’t sleep as much as we should have (you never do on vacation with kids) but these two slept whenever and wherever they could.

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Birdie fell asleep on me most days either on the beach or on the boat. I LOVED it, even if I got held hostage by her sleep and couldn’t go jump in the lake or go on the hikes. My future self will NEVER wish that I had less time with my babies asleep on my chest.

WE BBQ’D, ATE AND TALKED/DRANK:

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I don’t have any photos of it, but one night we got a sitter and took our adult friends out for a night cruise. We talked, danced and listened to music for FOUR HOURS. We all said that it was truly one of the most fun nights of our lives. We were alone on the lake, listening to college hits and for real DANCING.

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I don’t have pictures of us BBQing, eating or partying but needless to say, we DID IT UP. Everyone who knows me knows that I have two modes: work mode and party mode and I’m pretty great at rallying at both, so I had to really learn to just chill, cook, lay in the hammock and read with my kids. We made delicious food and watched a lot of family movies.

Also, we gave my brother hair extensions. So natural!

WE WENT TO LOLLIPOP PARK:

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There is also a tiny amusement park with a carousel, bumper cars, go-carts and a few toddler rides that the kids are OBSESSED with. It’s in the village and takes like 15 minutes to do with no lines, and it’s pretty cheap so we took each family there at least once.

This house, this mountain town is truly what our family needs. We are highly social so sometimes in LA, we invite too many people over and since I can’t sit down, I end up hosting to the point of burning out (without knowing it). So being up there, having one family at a time that stayed for an extended period of time meant that everyone was helping, I wasn’t “hosting” just providing the house. Also, the options for what to do are either woods, boat, pool or beach. Not having very many restaurants or museums/activities to go to means that your days are free to just choose what you feel like.

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Re-entry has been hard, but Labor Day is nearby and while I’m not doing much for my birthday this year, it’s more of an excuse to unplug and feel “on vacation.” But my 85-year-old version of myself was totally right: I don’t think I’ll ever regret how much time I spent with my kids, friends and family this summer. Memories were made, folks, and you BET I’ve already started my summer of 2019 scrapbook (it’s for the kids, duh :)).

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On Our Radar: 4 Up-and-Coming Ceramicists to Watch in Maine

We’ve written about ceramics and the talented ceramicists who create them from all corners of the globe—from Portugal to London to North Carolina—so it only made sense to highlight a few from Maine, a place where the artisan spirit is not only alive, but flourishing (in fact, we’re celebrating it all week). On our radar: […]

We’ve written about ceramics and the talented ceramicists who create them from all corners of the globe—from Portugal to London to North Carolina—so it only made sense to highlight a few from Maine, a place where the artisan spirit is not only alive, but flourishing (in fact, we’re celebrating it all week). On our radar: A new collection from a perennial favorite, a 14th-generation artisan, and more. Here’s a look.

Ariela Kuh

In the coastal community of Lincolnville, Maine, ceramicist Ariela Kuh of ANK Ceramics handcrafts tableware in a charming studio and finishes each piece with glazes mixed in small batches. Shown above is her Black Sand Mug, whose rough texture and purple-black glaze are evocative of its namesake.

In the coastal community of Lincolnville, Maine, ceramicist Ariela Kuh of ANK Ceramics handcrafts tableware in a charming studio and finishes each piece with glazes mixed in small batches. Shown above is her Black Sand Mug, whose rough texture and purple-black glaze are evocative of its namesake.

Above: In the coastal community of Lincolnville, Maine, ceramicist Ariela Kuh of ANK Ceramics handcrafts tableware in a charming studio and finishes each piece with glazes mixed in small batches. Shown above is her Black Sand Mug, whose rough texture and purple-black glaze are evocative of its namesake.

Hanako Nakazato

Fourteenth-generation ceramicist Hanako Nakazato divides her time between Japan and Maine (see her home in the tiny town of Union here) and brings the sensibilities of both locales to her work. Shown above is a selection of her ridged bowls on display in her own home. Photograph by Erin Little.

Fourteenth-generation ceramicist Hanako Nakazato divides her time between Japan and Maine (see her home in the tiny town of Union here) and brings the sensibilities of both locales to her work. Shown above is a selection of her ridged bowls on display in her own home. Photograph by Erin Little.

Above: Fourteenth-generation ceramicist Hanako Nakazato divides her time between Japan and Maine (see her home in the tiny town of Union here) and brings the sensibilities of both locales to her work. Shown above is a selection of her ridged bowls on display in her own home. Photograph by Erin Little.

Meghan Flynn

Lincolnville, Maine, native Meghan Flynn cites her daily life and the flora and fauna of her coastal home as inspiration for her crafts. The Wood-Fired Teapot shown above is part of a set of 100 pieces she fires in a wood-fired anagama kiln in Swanville, Maine, once a year. The wood-fired kiln, she says, takes four days to load and is stoked round-the-clock for eight days to create a set of one-of-a-kind pieces.

Lincolnville, Maine, native Meghan Flynn cites her daily life and the flora and fauna of her coastal home as inspiration for her crafts. The Wood-Fired Teapot shown above is part of a set of 100 pieces she fires in a wood-fired anagama kiln in Swanville, Maine, once a year. The wood-fired kiln, she says, takes four days to load and is stoked round-the-clock for eight days to create a set of one-of-a-kind pieces.

Above: Lincolnville, Maine, native Meghan Flynn cites her daily life and the flora and fauna of her coastal home as inspiration for her crafts. The Wood-Fired Teapot shown above is part of a set of 100 pieces she fires in a wood-fired anagama kiln in Swanville, Maine, once a year. The wood-fired kiln, she says, takes four days to load and is stoked round-the-clock for eight days to create a set of one-of-a-kind pieces.

Michele Michael

Elephant Ceramics‘ Michele Michael was working as a prop stylist when she started making her own ceramics to get the exact shapes and colors she needed for her work. A rural Maine transplant from Brooklyn (check out our tour of her Red Hook apartment here), Michael’s work is inspired by the surrounding nature and incorporates the unique texture of homespun linen. Shown here: Platters from her new collection in shades of indigo. Photograph by Winky Lewis.

Elephant Ceramics‘ Michele Michael was working as a prop stylist when she started making her own ceramics to get the exact shapes and colors she needed for her work. A rural Maine transplant from Brooklyn (check out our tour of her Red Hook apartment here), Michael’s work is inspired by the surrounding nature and incorporates the unique texture of homespun linen. Shown here: Platters from her new collection in shades of indigo. Photograph by Winky Lewis.

Above: Elephant Ceramics‘ Michele Michael was working as a prop stylist when she started making her own ceramics to get the exact shapes and colors she needed for her work. A rural Maine transplant from Brooklyn (check out our tour of her Red Hook apartment here), Michael’s work is inspired by the surrounding nature and incorporates the unique texture of homespun linen. Shown here: Platters from her new collection in shades of indigo. Photograph by Winky Lewis.

More from our design-worthy dive into Maine:

A Modest Beach Cottage on Martha’s Vineyard Goes from “Bad Seventies” to “Good Seventies”

When NYC interior designer Ellen Hamilton recently undertook the renovation of a 1970s beach cottage in Chilmark, Massachusetts, she knew it would be neither the biggest project she’d ever undertake, nor the most dramatic transformation—but its modesty is exactly what appealed to her. Chilmark is a town on Martha’s Vineyard, a small island near Cape […]

When NYC interior designer Ellen Hamilton recently undertook the renovation of a 1970s beach cottage in Chilmark, Massachusetts, she knew it would be neither the biggest project she’d ever undertake, nor the most dramatic transformation—but its modesty is exactly what appealed to her.

Chilmark is a town on Martha’s Vineyard, a small island near Cape Cod that’s both undeniably beautiful and undeniably wealthy. “When you see a coastline like this,” says Hamilton, “everyone’s initial instinct is to overbuild—to have a glamorous and big house.” (The next-door neighbor is a well-known billionaire.) But her client wanted to keep both the footprint and the character of her small abode: “She could have torn it down and put up a big number,” says Hamilton. “Instead, she used restraint all around, and I think that’s pretty great.”

What did need changing about the house—which serves as guest quarters to a new home next door—was the interior finishes. The house hadn’t been updated since it was built and flaunted a color scheme of turquoise, purple, and green. The renovation required a fast turnaround—work began in mid-January and the first guests arrived July 4, so Hamilton made quick work of tailoring the cottage to her client’s “clean, Scandinavian” taste. They retained the existing windows to keep costs down, and added shiplap paneling, a coat of white paint, and Scandinavian modern furnishings—many from the 1970s—throughout. “This house is so special because it’s so simple,” says Hamilton. “We let it keep its character and took the ‘under-improvement’ approach. In other words, it was bad seventies, and we turned it into good seventies.”

Photography by Max Kim Bee, courtesy of Ellen Hamilton. 

 The kitchen, which overlooks the living room, kept its previous footprint but otherwise received a complete overhaul with Carrara marble countertops, a backsplash of textured white tile from Ann Sacks, and locally made Shaker-style cabinetry with Swedish hardware.

 The kitchen, which overlooks the living room, kept its previous footprint but otherwise received a complete overhaul with Carrara marble countertops, a backsplash of textured white tile from Ann Sacks, and locally made Shaker-style cabinetry with Swedish hardware.

Above: The kitchen, which overlooks the living room, kept its previous footprint but otherwise received a complete overhaul with Carrara marble countertops, a backsplash of textured white tile from Ann Sacks, and locally made Shaker-style cabinetry with Swedish hardware. At one end of the living room, a drop-down sofa from the Danish Design Store converts into a single bed for extra guests.

At one end of the living room, a drop-down sofa from the Danish Design Store converts into a single bed for extra guests.

Above: At one end of the living room, a drop-down sofa from the Danish Design Store converts into a single bed for extra guests.

Hamilton was able to incur a huge cost savings by keeping the cottage’s original windows—which had white screens, brass handles, and heavy oak trim. She swapped in unassuming white handles and a thinner, white-painted trim, saving time and money while “lightening the room substantially,” she says.

At the other end of the price spectrum, says Hamilton, “there were a few pieces of furniture we really splurged on”: specifically, a Hans Wegner Circle Chair and Kaare Klint for Carl Hansen Safari Chair, both shown here.

The two off-white living room sofas are from Croft House; pricey, says Hamilton, but balanced with a lamp and corner table from Ikea, among other affordable finds.

The two off-white living room sofas are from Croft House; pricey, says Hamilton, but balanced with a lamp and corner table from Ikea, among other affordable finds.

Above: The two off-white living room sofas are from Croft House; pricey, says Hamilton, but balanced with a lamp and corner table from Ikea, among other affordable finds. The main question for the interiors, says Hamilton, was “how to take a boxy little house and make it feel really pleasant.” She chose furniture with rounded sides and corners: “When you’re in such a boxy space, you can use the furniture to do some of the heavy lifting the architecture can’t do,” she says. She also positioned everything slightly off-kilter, “never on a grid—that’s furniture placement 101 in a small space.”

A small deck off the living room serves as a “lookout point” for viewing across the water.

A small bathroom with shower serves the upstairs social spaces (the living room and kitchen). The wall-mounted vanity is from WetStyle and the wall and floor tile is Ann Sacks.

A small bathroom with shower serves the upstairs social spaces (the living room and kitchen). The wall-mounted vanity is from WetStyle and the wall and floor tile is Ann Sacks.

Above: A small bathroom with shower serves the upstairs social spaces (the living room and kitchen). The wall-mounted vanity is from WetStyle and the wall and floor tile is Ann Sacks. The master bedroom, with a bed from West Elm. The flooring (used throughout the house) is whitewashed, refinished wood from PID Floors in Brooklyn.

The master bedroom, with a bed from West Elm. The flooring (used throughout the house) is whitewashed, refinished wood from PID Floors in Brooklyn.

Above: The master bedroom, with a bed from West Elm. The flooring (used throughout the house) is whitewashed, refinished wood from PID Floors in Brooklyn.

Reveal: How We Brightened Up a Room (and Some Deserving Lives) with Velux Skylights

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Today’s reveal is my favorite type of “work” and why I feel like the luckiest person on the planet that this is my job. Velux skylights approached me about doing a makeover for a family that could use some “brightening up,” and I said “yes” very quickly. When your job is helping others through design… Read More …

The post Reveal: How We Brightened Up a Room (and Some Deserving Lives) with Velux Skylights appeared first on Emily Henderson.

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Today’s reveal is my favorite type of “work” and why I feel like the luckiest person on the planet that this is my job. Velux skylights approached me about doing a makeover for a family that could use some “brightening up,” and I said “yes” very quickly. When your job is helping others through design and style, you feel pretty darn lucky. We posted about the contest here, and hundreds of you entered to get the free makeover, which included new skylights. Raeann secretly entered Kristen for the contest, both being avid readers for years (THANK YOU) and their story was one that seemed perfect for what we were going to be able to bring to them. Here they are, with myself and the design lead on this job, Julie Rose.

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Kristen and Raeann have been together for 7 years, married for nearly one. They live in Salt Lake City and bought their house a year and a half ago. Last year, Kristen (32) was diagnosed with a rare form of cancer called Cholangiocarcinoma, which she was predisposed to genetically. Typically, those who are diagnosed with this type of cancer are over the age of 65 and found more commonly in males. This is why it was very shocking that Kristen got diagnosed at such a young age. Obviously, that threw their life into a spin of fear and just so many unknowns. She began a clinical test and rounds of chemo, one that didn’t make her lose her hair (it’s a new clinical trial), but of course inside she wasn’t feeling good AT ALL.

So when Raeann entered her and we saw her bedroom, we knew that they were the perfect family for this. Kristen was spending a lot of time in her bedroom, resting, sleeping and recovering from the chemo treatments, and we were about to make that room so much more beautiful, comfortable and yes, bright and airy.

Here’s what Raeann envisioned for the space: “My wife just started chemo and is spending a lot more time in bed these days. I would love for our bedroom to be more of a haven for her—a serene, comforting, and light space that brings her peace and happiness when other things are tough.”

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So Julie and myself flew out to Salt Lake City to meet them and get a sense of what their style was and really understand what they wanted for the space. I can’t tell you how wonderful they were and we clicked immediately and didn’t want to leave. I wrote about the process yesterday as it was fast and saved us a ton of time. They trusted us—with some guidance—which made the process so fast and easy plus we really loved their style and what they had pinned to a Pinterest board for the giveaway. I know that you guys are awesome, but to hang out with two that have been reading for years solidifies that I have the BEST READERS IN THE WORLD.

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Their Functional Needs:

1. More light: The room needed more light and was honestly a perfect candidate for skylights. I am a firm believer that natural light changes the entire mood and feel of a room. In fact, studies show that people in hospitals with windows, who can see nature, may heal faster. By putting in skylights not only do you get more light, but you can see the sky, the clouds, the blue while you are laying down (and the stars at night). We put in two Velux No Leak Solar Powered “Fresh Air” skylights that are roughly 2 feet wide by 3 feet tall on the eastern wall because morning light is soft and prettier than afternoon light. Your Velux consultant or contractor can help you determine the best placement in your room so you are optimizing the light in the smartest way.

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2. A bigger, cozier, bed: Right from the start, we determined that the bed should stay along the wall it was on initially but I convinced them that they had to get a king-size bed (which for them meant a brand new mattress from Tuft & Needle). They also wanted something more dog-friendly, i.e. lower so their pup, Izzy, could get on and off easily in her older years.

3. More nightstand storage: When you are in bed all day, you accumulate things around you (cups, books, etc.), so more space both in and out of drawers would be helpful.

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Their Stylistic Wants:

Cozy and comfortable: After the initial small talk, we asked Raeann and Kristen to describe the feel of the room they wanted when they walked in for the reveal. Words like serene, cozy, comfortable, bright and Zen came out of their mouths and into our design minds. That, combined with being able to sit down with them and go through their pre-pinned Pinterest board, was a great learning experience to see what and why people are drawn to a random room from the internet.

Lots of layers, textures but not too many patterns: The wall-to-wall carpet was not bad but we decided to layer a lighter and brighter rug with some texture would make the space feel bigger and cozier. We went with subtle white Roman shades from Tonic Living (who were gracious enough to RUSH deliver these to us, thank you Tonic Living!) that filtered some light but visually “disappear” when needed. Oh, and as for things to avoid: NO velvet. Kristen HATES the feel of velvet for some reason, like my cats used to hate fur, she is repelled by the feeling of it.

As we wrote yesterday, we wanted it to feel serene but luxurious, neutral but with personality. So soft, so easy, so stress-less, with more storage and more bright (yet soft) light.

We planned from LA, and loaded up a big moving truck the Saturday before the week of the install. Within two days (with a lot of prep from my team, led by Julie), we transformed this space and absolutely brightened up their room (and yes, also their life). It’s so warm, happy, layered and yet simple and easy to navigate both stylistically and functionally.

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The Color Palette: We kept all the major pieces neutral and calm, and then layered on some higher contrast. Honestly, this is really the safest and easiest route to go if you aren’t into having a risky bedroom. It also keeps it really easy to change styles and colors in accessories and bedding. That bed, from Living Spaces, is a STEAL at $450 (for a KING!) and that upholstered headboard makes it so much more comfortable than the original wood one they had in the space. Kristen and Raeann both liked navy (as do we, duh) so it was really an EHD palette that we are very comfortable with—gray, white, navy with a lot of wood and natural textures.

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Textures: While we don’t have a lot of high contrast patterns, we do have a lot of textures throughout not only in the bedding but also the furniture. Please note the wood/woven nightstand from Serena and Lily. It’s very special and not just because it has leather pulls. The rug has a strangely soft texture (and is also so affordable for how soft and huge it is, a 9’x12′ for $338); it also brings in a slight pattern. Even the lamp has visual texture, with splatter paint all over it. Kristen loves woven window treatments but since we wanted to make sure the space could be completely dark during the day, we brought this element into the space through the nightstands and pendant over the bed.

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Art: In an attempt to always have art be a more personal element in the room, we brought in a lot of family photos that we put into readymade frames.

But, we found the perfect large scale art for the space in the most kismet way. For our stay, Julie booked a house for the whole team through Airbnb not knowing at the time that it belonged to Holly Addi who is a local artist in SLC. Her abstract paintings are INCREDIBLE and also owns one of the cutest stores in town called Arte Haus Collectif. Her work is so beautiful and I wanted (still want) many pieces for my own home. If you don’t live in the SLC area, you can purchase her work through Uprise Art and she has a lot more in that collection that the whole team loved.

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After hearing this story and seeing how perfect her piece would be in here, she was lovely enough to cut us a deal so this piece could live in the room. Look how incredible it is. We loved that it was overscale for that wall and yet fit so cohesively into the space. Thank you, Holly!

They were SO happy when they saw the piece and I told them the story.

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I would be psyched, too. 🙂

We also added a ceramic sculpture over the bed from MQuan which was the perfect textural yet quiet piece that engaged the space without being too big.

Now for the reason we are all here:

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The Skylights: The two new skylights transformed the vibe of the space a couple of weeks before we redecorated. We saw photos and sighed with relief, knowing that it was SO much better already. The morning light floods in but don’t worry, the remote-controlled room darkening shades keep it dark until they are ready to get out of bed.

I have a ton of experience with these shades, having them in our master bedroom at the mountain house as well and opening them in the morning is an absolute JOY. If you are worried about big blocks of light or too much light, just know it’s all about placement of the skylights. Overhead, around noon, yes you are going to get more of a block of light that is actually really beautiful (and you can close the shades for a daytime nap), but in the morning and evening, it’s soft and creates a diffused light ambiance. Yes. Call me a huge fan of these.

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They also open to let air out which is great for this family because they only had one floor vent for their central AC and even had to add a window unit (that we took out for the shots) to keep the room cool and since it’s on the second floor, it can pull air from the house and let it out during the hot SLC summer days.

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Izzy is very much loving the fresh air (and of course her new bed from The Wolf Nest).

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Storage: Besides the huge nightstands, on the other side of the room we have this BEAUTIFUL dresser by Hedge House Furniture, which I’ve wanted for a while. It’s so simple, beautiful and handmade (in the US).

Look at those beautiful lines and the finish of the wood. Since this dresser was a bit smaller than the one they had previously, we later revealed to Kristen and Raeann that we bought additional dressers for inside their closet and yes, Raeann cried again which was very sweet.

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Seating: Kristen and Raeann didn’t really need seating in here, but that doesn’t mean that we didn’t give them a pretty cute little corner vignette with one of our favorite contemporary chairs from Article. The scale on it is large while still being simple, and the wood and leather tie in with the nightstands so they speak to each other. We got the stool from MidCenturyLA which we love (they might have more, we bought two, one lives in the mountain house). We added more family photos, a sculptural light from Target, and some cozy elements like the throw from The Citizenry and pillow from Lulu and Georgia.

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Bedding: We wanted the bedding to be super comfortable and cozy, with enough texture and pattern to have interest but to mostly be neutral and calm. It’s a lot of more affordable (and very soft) Target sheets and duvets with some more splurge-y pillows from Filling Spaces and Lulu and Georgia—once again showing that it’s all about styling and context.

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A massive thanks to my entire team, led by Julie Rose…you killed it! And to the most lovely “clients” who really gave us creative freedom to make their lives better. When we did our first surprise makeover (or Feel Good Flash Makeover) it was never intended for them have a partner, but my god, if this can be our new business, companies helping us fund these makeover that make lives better, then it’s such a win.win.win. And yes, we’ll be able to do so many more than we ever could on our own.

Thank you, Velux, for making our job more fun and fulfilling and for helping us make this room, and this family’s lives, brighter.

Speaking of which…did they like it???

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The answer is YES. They couldn’t really believe what we had done in those two days and were shocked that it was their new bedroom, that everything was now theirs.

And good news: Kristen finished her first round of chemo and is awaiting tests but she feels decent…she’s still excited to get a lot of use out of this bedroom on the weekends and nights.

They wrote to us after the makeover and said this about their experience:

“We feel so lucky to have had this experience. We LOVE our new space and we were blown away by the kindness and generosity of Emily’s team and at Velux. We love waking up in our serene bedroom because it really feels like a retreat from all the other chaos we have in our lives right now. And Emily was so right, the upholstered headboard really is like another pillow. :)”

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Please watch the video of the full makeover and reveal, here:

Thanks again, Velux Skylights for being so darn wonderful, both in product and throughout this process. And a big thank you to Kristen and Raeann for being fun, easy and so open to our ideas, and, of course, thank you EHD team (Julie Rose and Emily Bowser on the design, install and styling, plus Mallory Wackerman and Chandler Frame for assisting day-of) for all your hard work, long nights, creativity and care.

We honestly can’t wait to do more.

If you want to know what product we used and who we love, here you go:

Emily Henderson Design Velux Master Bedroom Boho Neutral Get The Look 01

1. Bed Frame from Living Spaces | 2. Stoneware Discs by MQUAN | 3. Rattan Basket Light | 4. White Duvet Cover | 5. Sheet Set | 6. Throw Blanket | 7. Moroccan Oversized Bedding Throw | 8. Rug from RugsUSA | 9. Sheepskin Rug from Article | 10. Lumbar Pillow from Lulu and Georgia | 11. Lumbar Pillow from Filling Spaces | 12. Table Lamp from Lulu and Georgia | 13. Nightstand from Serena & Lily | 14. Ceramic Planter | 15. Marble Bowl | 16. Wood Vase | 17. Gold Ring | 18. White Vase | 19. Wood Tray | 20. The Flower Expert Book | 21. The Home Edit Book | 22. Lumbar Pillow from Lulu and Georgia | 23. Alpaca Throw from The Citizenry | 24. Window Treatment by Tonic Living | 25. Velux Skylights | 26. Art by Holly Addi | 27. Stool from Midcentury LA | 28. Chair from Article | 29.  Floor Lamp | 30. Calm The Chaos Journal | 31. Pause Journal | 32. Olive Canvas Dog Bed | 33. Unisex Perfume | 34. Round Box | 35. Tray | 36. Square Frame | 37. Wood Frame | 38. Rectangle Frame | 39. Mirror | 40. Dome Light by Shades of Light | 41. Table Lamp | 42. In The Company of Women Book | 43. Homebody by Joanna Gaines Book | 44. Custom Dresser by Hedge House Furniture

*This post is in partnership with Velux but all words, designs and selections are our own. Thanks for supporting the brands we love that support the blog.

**photography by Sara Ligorria-Tramp for EHD

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